3 Steps to Get an Anonymous Car Insurance Quote

3 Steps to Get an Anonymous Car Insurance Quote

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An anonymous car insurance quote is difficult to get because rates are heavily personalized. You typically will have to reveal your name, address, age and driving record, and in some cases, your social security number (SSN). Later in the process, you will have to provide a vehicle identification number (VIN) for your vehicle.

Some online tools allow you to compare quotes anonymously or by revealing relatively little information. However, they only offer rough totals and do not offer a binding quote that can necessarily be purchased at the presented price.

How to get an anonymous car insurance estimate without revealing personal information

One of the quickest ways to get a sense of auto insurance costs without divulging personal information is to use a car insurance calculator. This tool will use the state you live in and your coverage needs to estimate an average cost for a policy. In addition, you can adjust liability, comprehensive and collision coverages as well as your location to see how costs vary.

Online calculators allow you to get a quick quote estimate without sharing personal information. Getting a binding quote — the price for which you can definitively purchase a policy — will require sharing information such as an address, vehicle information, driving history, marital status and homeownership.

How to get a binding insurance quote, and what you need to disclose

You have to go through an individual insurance provider or a broker to get a binding quote you can actually purchase. To do that, you will have to share information about yourself, including several pieces of personally identifiable information in most cases.

Every insurer will require you to provide an address to get a quote. Most will also require your name. Many insurers will ask for a social security number but not require it. Most will not ask for a VIN until after providing a quote.

A few insurance providers will give you a quote without a name, for example, The General. However, insurance rates are built on a wide range of factors, most of which are tied to the purchaser and their situation. If an insurer is going to offer a definitive quote, it will need to know about the vehicle or vehicles on the policy, drivers and a host of other factors about the financial picture. That information often includes:

  • How the vehicle will be used
  • Age
  • Gender
  • Make, age and model of cars on the policy
  • Email address
  • Phone number

Some insurers will also ask for your profession.

Providing contact information often results in insurance providers emailing or calling drivers, something many consumers find obtrusive. One way to mitigate this is to use a second email address that isn't your primary one. That allows you to keep online insurance offers in a separate place without filling up your main inbox.

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Do you need to provide a social security number or VIN to get a quote?

If you're looking for a quote, you often do not have to disclose certain sensitive information, such as your SSN or VIN. Some insurers will allow you to put off providing a social security number until after you receive a quote. Most will allow you to get a quote before providing a VIN.

Social security number

Your social security number is used to check your credit score, which can impact your premium. That credit check will not affect your credit score. A few states do not allow insurers to factor credit scores into rates.

An insurance quote is binding when the policy can be purchased at the price being quoted. A quote isn't fully binding until an insurance company has checked some key information, including credit score and official driving record. If you provide inaccurate information while getting a quote, it can change the final rate or lead to the offer being pulled.

It's important to note that providing more information should mean a more accurate and likely lower quote than comparing rates anonymously. If an insurance provider is missing a piece of information, it will usually default to assuming you are more of a risk, which means higher rates.

You should avoid giving out your SSN unless it's necessary. Identity thieves can use it to create accounts in your name and damage your credit.

Other information you can often avoid giving an insurer until after getting a quote includes:

  • Vehicle identification number for any cars or trucks on the policy
  • License numbers for any drivers on the policy

Vehicle identification number

In some cases, insurers will ask for a VIN, sometimes called a vehicle registration number, during the process of getting a free car insurance quote. Insurers often do not require it until actual policy purchase, though you will be giving up data about yourself.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you get a completely anonymous car insurance quote?

No. You can get an estimate. The more personal information you provide, the more accurate a quote will be.

Can you get a quote without giving your name?

In some rare cases, yes. Most insurance companies require a name before offering a quote.

Can you get a quote without providing your social security number?

Some companies will allow you to put off providing a social security number until after you receive a quote. However, by the end of the process you will almost certainly have to provide your SSN.

Can you get a quote without giving your vehicle identification number?

Yes, you can get a quote without a VIN. You cannot purchase a policy without providing that number to your insurer.

Is the quote you receive the final price you will pay?

Not necessarily. A quote might be given without all relevant information, which means the price can change when the rest of the information is processed. If you provide incorrect or false information, it could change your final price or result in the offer being rescinded.

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