How Much Is Motorcycle Insurance for an 18-Year-Old?

COVID-19 Update: If you're thinking about motorcycle insurance in the context of coronavirus, see below for information.

Motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds is more expensive than the cost of insuring other types of drivers. We calculated that the cheapest motorcycle insurance cost for 18-year-old drivers is $582 per year, but premiums can vary significantly depending on your state and insurance provider.

{"onCurrent":"true","product":"motorcycle","defaultZip":"90210","customEventLabel":"Zip code quotebox"}


In addition to location, price depends on the coverage limits you suggest, driving history and gender, as well as other factors. While motorcycle insurance rates tend to be high for young drivers, you can save money by comparing quotes, qualifying for certain discounts and by getting your parents to purchase the policy.

How much does motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds cost?

We found that the average cost of motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds is $998 per year — about $83 per month.

While companies use age to determine motorcycle insurance rates, there are other factors responsible for the typical cost of motorcycle insurance, including where you live. Below, we've visualized the average cost of motorcycle insurance for 18-year-old riders in the country's largest cities. Despite requesting the same coverage for the same motorcycle, we found that rates can vary by up to $700 per year.

A bar graph showing the average costs of motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York
A bar graph showing the average costs of motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York

Your gender can slightly influence the price of motorcycle insurance, too. Typically, insurers quote both genders the same or nearly the same figure. We found that the average price for motorcycle insurance for an 18-year-old male is $928 per year, only about $11 cheaper per year than coverage for an 18-year-old female.

As you can see from the following table, most providers quote similar prices to men and women for motorcycle insurance. The widest gap between genders comes from Dairyland, where 4% separates the average quoted prices for men and women.

Rider profileProgressive motorcycle insuranceGEICO motorcycle insuranceDairyland motorcycle insuranceAllstate motorcycle insuranceNationwide motorcycle insuranceAverage
18-year-old man$1,089$974$1,371$1,008$582$1,005
18-year-old woman$1,088$974$1,430$1,008$582$1,016
Annual difference in rates for men compared to women&lt
1%
&lt
1%
-4%&lt
1%
&lt
1%
-1%

Why is the average cost of motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds so high?

Statistically, younger drivers are more likely to be involved in accidents. Insurance companies interpret this data to mean that 18-year-olds are among their riskiest customers — and higher risk means a higher cost of insurance.

How does insurance work?: You pay your insurer every month to cover the costs of an accident involving your motorcycle. Because young drivers are most likely to get into accidents, insurers raise the cost of your protection to reflect the higher-than-average odds, in order to protect themselves.

Insurance companies giving high rates to young drivers isn't exclusive to motorcycle insurance — it can be difficult to find cheap auto insurance for young drivers, too. However, as drivers age, they are more likely to receive lower rates as long as they don't incur moving violations.

How to save on motorcycle insurance as an 18-year-old

While motorcycle insurance is generally expensive for 18-year-olds, there are a few methods you can use to save money on motorcycle insurance. Some of the simplest ways to reduce your motorcycle insurance price are to compare rates, take advantage of discounts and purchase the policy through your parents.

Compare rates from multiple insurers

We recommend comparing the costs of motorcycle coverage offered by multiple companies. The price for motorcycle coverage can vary significantly depending on the provider.

According to our quote data for 18-year-old motorcycle riders, the difference between the lowest and highest rates is $789 per year for males and $849 per year for females.

A bar graph showing the average costs of motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds by company
A bar graph showing the average costs of motorcycle insurance for 18-year-olds by company

Many large motorcycle insurance companies make it easy to compare quotes directly through their websites. Often, with companies such as Progressive, GEICO and Nationwide, we've found you can request a quote and purchase coverage online in under five minutes.

{"onCurrent":"true","product":"motorcycle","defaultZip":"90210","customEventLabel":"Zip code quotebox"}


Utilizing discounts

It's common for motorcycle insurance companies to offer discounts to more-experienced riders or to policyholders renewing their coverage, making these discounts impossible to get for 18-year-olds. However, there are many discounts that are easy for even young riders to qualify for, including:

  • Requesting a quote a couple days before your policy's start date
  • Signing up for automatic payments
  • Completing a safety course
  • Holding a valid motorcycle endorsement on your license
  • Having a bike with anti-lock brakes or an anti-theft device
  • Being a part of some school-affiliated organizations

Obtain coverage through your parents

If your parents have an existing auto insurance policy, consider asking them to purchase motorcycle insurance coverage with their current insurer. Doing this is cost effective for 18-year-old drivers compared to the price of a stand-alone policy.

Your parents' insurance rates would likely be lower than yours because of the benefit of a bundle discount for insuring multiple vehicles. If your parents are homeowners, they could also get an additional discount. This route, though, requires your parents to have good driving records.

What about moped insurance and scooter insurance for 18-year-olds?

Almost all insurance companies cover mopeds and scooters under their motorcycle insurance policies. Insurance policies specifically designed for mopeds and scooters are quite rare. If you're an 18-year-old looking for moped or scooter insurance, your best bet is to get coverage through a company that sells motorcycle insurance.

How does coronavirus affect your motorcycle insurance?

Many auto insurance providers are taking actions that could impact motorcycle policyholders. You're still legally required to carry motorcycle insurance even if you're not riding your bike due to social-distancing and shelter-in-place laws. However, providers are easing the financial burden imposed on their customers by giving money back. Companies like GEICO are refunding a portion of policyholders' premiums — usually around 20-30% of April and May payments.

Methodology

We calculated our motorcycle insurance rates for 18-year-olds using addresses in New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago. The following companies offered quotes online:

  • Progressive
  • GEICO
  • Dairyland
  • Allstate
  • Nationwide

To keep things consistent across quotes, we stuck to a sample rider profile for a 2016 Honda Rebel CMX250C. We obtained quotes for both male and female 18-year-old riders. We insured this bike for:

  • Bodily injury liability: $100,000 per person / $300,000 per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage (UIM): $100,000 per incident / $300,000 per accident
  • Property damage liability: $50,000 per incident

Additionally, in states where carrying UIM was required, we added this protection for $100,000 per person / $300,000 per accident to align with our selected bodily injury liability coverage.

We typically recommend getting more insurance than the state's minimums to protect yourself and your assets. Although it can be a good idea to carry comprehensive or collision protection in addition to basic protection, adding this protection for an 18-year-old driver often caused our sample rates to fluctuate dramatically.

Joe Resendiz

Joe Resendiz is a former investment banking analyst for Goldman Sachs, where he covered public sector and infrastructure financing. During his time on Wall Street, Joe worked closely with the debt capital markets team, which allowed him to gain unique insights into the credit market. Joe is currently a research analyst who covers credit cards and the payments industry. He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin, where he majored in finance.

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.