Who Has The Cheapest Motorcycle Insurance Quotes In Florida?

Find the Cheapest Motorcycle Insurance Quotes in Your Area

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After reviewing nearly 200 motorcycle insurance quotes in Florida, we've determined that Progressive is the best choice for most riders thanks to its great balance of affordability and coverage options. Our data showed that Progressive's motorcycle policy offers substantial savings in Florida, where the average cost of motorcycle insurance is $911 per year. Find out which of our recommendations line up with your needs, or use the quote tool above to compare quotes from companies near you.

Best for most people: Progressive

For most Floridians interested in motorcycle insurance, Progressive delivers the best balance of affordability and quality coverage. The quotes we collected from Progressive in Florida revealed an average annual premium of $661 — not the lowest rate we encountered, but still at least 27% cheaper than the statewide average. In addition, each accident-free year that you carry Progressive motorcycle insurance nets you a 25% discount on your deductible for the next year.

Though its rates are lower than most, Progressive nevertheless delivers high-end coverage features such as full replacement cost coverage and original equipment manufacturer (OEM) parts coverage. These features may raise your premiums, but they guarantee that any damage to your ride will be restored at no extra cost — no matter how bad the damage gets. We recommend Progressive for most motorcyclists because it offers such extensive protection for a reasonable rate.

Progressive also passed our test for customer service, posting an excellent complaint index of 0.69 according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). Progressive also has a financial stability rating of A+ from A.M. Best, a credit rating agency that focuses on the insurance industry. Its J.D. Power customer satisfaction rating is on the low side at 2 out of 5, but no other insurer we looked at in Florida could match the overall value we see in Progressive's motorcycle insurance offering.

Best for cheap coverage: Esurance

If your main goal is to insure your motorcycle in Florida for as little as possible, we believe Esurance is the first place to look. With an average annual premium of $583 in Florida, a motorcycle insurance policy with Esurance costs almost $330 less than the average statewide. At this price point, Esurance delivers a reasonable level of features, but its customer satisfaction ratings are lower than our best overall pick.

Getting motorcycle insurance through Esurance gives you access to as many as nine potential discounts on your final rate. These include everything from multi-vehicle discounts for car owners to feature-driven discounts for having anti-lock brakes and a theft recovery device. You can find further value in Esurance motorcycle coverage through the features it makes available, such as replacement cost coverage and trip interruption coverage.

While Esurance was the cheapest option we found, it's worth mentioning that you may be able to find even lower quotes from smaller insurers we didn't consider. However, our choice of Esurance as the best option for cheap motorcycle insurance in Florida reflects more than the price tag: It also made the list thanks to the strength of its features and the overall value we see reflected in the company's services.

Best for motorcycle-specific coverage: Markel

If you're a dedicated enthusiast in search of the best possible insurance for your motorcycle, we recommend Markel and its comprehensive set of coverages. Markel lets you fine-tune policy details far more than most other insurers, with options for insurance to cover accessories, trailers and any consequences of mechanical breakdown. Markel's policies can even cover the cost of renting a replacement bike while yours is in the shop.

What counts as an accessory on your bike?

Most insurers define an accessory as anything added to your motorcycle after it left the factory. Accessories may be subject to a lower coverage limit or no coverage at all.

  • Aftermarket parts: crash bars, sissy bars, windshields
  • Electronics: onboard GPS, radios, light bars
  • Storage: saddle bags, luggage racks
  • Custom trim: fairings, paint, chrome

These many advantages come at a cost. Markel's average premium for a year of coverage came out to $1,381 by our estimate — far higher than Florida's statewide average. That price tag is slightly more reasonable if you manage to stay accident-free with Markel, which lowers your premium by 25% each year. Ultimately, we've included Markel as a recommendation because few other insurers cater so specifically to the needs of motorcyclists. If you've invested a lot in your ride, insuring it through Markel could be the best way to protect it.

Comparing Florida motorcycle insurers by customer service quality

Usually, the first thing people consider in choosing a motorcycle insurance policy is the price tag — but here, we've gone a step further and evaluated each insurance provider based on the expected quality of its service. We approached this question with the help of three metrics: the insurer complaint indexes maintained by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), consumer satisfaction surveys from J.D. Power, and financial strength ratings put out by A.M. Best.

InsurerNAIC Complaint IndexJ.D. Power ratingA.M. Best FSR
Dairyland2.12-A+
Esurance1.303 / 5A+
GEICO0.923 / 5A++
Markel0.00*-A
Progressive0.692 / 5A+
Markel did not receive any personal vehicle insurance complaints in 2018. However, this may be a result of Markel's very small market share.

Reviewing these ratings gave us an approximate picture of how well each insurance company would meet a customer's needs in a claim situation. The NAIC index represents a company's share of complaints compared to its share of the insurance market — a lower index is better. Meanwhile, J.D. Power surveys assign ratings to insurers based on customers' opinions about how satisfactory their experiences were in each step of the insurance experience.

Finally, A.M. Best's financial stability ratings provide an estimate of how strong a company is financially. Insurance providers with high A.M. Best ratings are extremely unlikely to have trouble paying out your claim, which can happen to less stable companies when they must handle thousands of simultaneous claims due to a disaster. Most insurers you'll find are generally stable, but using these numbers guaranteed that our selection process wasn't overlooking the most critical quality of an insurance policy: reliability.

The cheapest motorcycle insurance companies in Florida

In Florida, we found that the most affordable motorcycle insurance in each ZIP code came from Esurance, which had a low average premium of $584 compared to the industry average of $912. Rates were also fairly low at GEICO. All of our quotes were based on coverage limits that were substantially higher than the state's legal insurance requirements, which means that the average for bare minimum coverage will be even lower.

Bar graph comparing annual insurance premiums for motorcycle riders in Florida

As we've noted above, the cheapest policy isn't always the best option. If the insurers we've mentioned don't fit the bill, you can find other options in our coverage of the best motorcycle insurance companies in the nation as a whole.

Motorcycle license requirements in Florida

If you plan to ride a motorcycle while visiting or living in Florida, obeying the state's motorcycle laws and licensing requirements will help you avoid tickets, fines and other penalties. In order to obtain a Florida motorcycle license, you should start by figuring out what licenses you already have.

If you already have a Florida Class E driver's license and want to add a motorcycle endorsement, you'll need to complete a motorcycle safety course and find an authorized sponsor. You can choose either the Basic RiderCourse (BRC) or Basic RiderCourse updated (BRCu). Once you've completed the safety course, you'll have one year to apply for and obtain a motorcycle endorsement.

If you already have a driver's license from another state with a motorcycle endorsement, there are no additional requirements — Florida will recognize your endorsement. The only exception is for motorcycle endorsements on licenses from Alabama, which are only recognized in Florida once you complete a motorcycle safety course.

If you want to apply for a motorcycle-only license in Florida, you'll need to be at least 16 years old and pass the written test for a Class E driver's license. You'll also need to complete a motorcycle safety course with an authorized sponsor. Finally, there's one last extra requirement for anyone under 18: maintain a learner's license for at least one year with no traffic violations.

Once you've met the requirements above, you can schedule an appointment at any Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles office to get a Florida motorcycle license. If you're looking for a Florida motorcycle license class, the DHSMV's site provides a comprehensive overview of class locations and courses offered. Finally, you'll need to pay one or both of these fees in your application:

  • Florida Motorcycle Licensing Fee: $48
  • Florida Motorcycle Endorsement Fee: $7

What are the penalties for riding without a motorcycle endorsement in Florida?

Under Florida law, operating a motorcycle without an endorsement is considered a second-degree misdemeanor. Riding without a valid endorsement can lead to severe consequences:

  • immediate impounding of your motorcycle
  • a fine of $500
  • six months of probation
  • up to 60 days in jail

While the process of getting a motorcycle endorsement in Florida can take some time, it's a necessary part of responsible motorcycle ownership. Riding without a proper license is never worth the risk to your safety, your bike or your freedom.

Florida motorcycle helmet law

Florida motorcycle laws require that all riders and passengers wear helmets that comply with the U.S. Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, unless they're inside an enclosed cab. Additionally, riders must wear compliant eye protection while riding a motorcycle. At ValuePenguin, we recommend wearing a helmet at all times, whether or not the law requires it.

However, there are exceptions to Florida's helmet rule. If you're over 21, you’re not required to wear a helmet as long as you show proof of motorcycle insurance with at least $10,000 in medical benefits coverage for accident-related injuries.

If you're over 16, you can ignore the helmet requirement when you ride a motorcycle that cannot go faster than 30 miles per hour and either:

  • Is not rated in excess of 2 braking horsepower OR
  • Has a motor with a displacement of 50 cubic centimeters or less

If you're under 16, there are no exceptions: You must always wear a helmet when on a motorcycle in Florida.

Other Florida Motorcycle Laws

Passenger Laws: Florida law prohibits passengers on motorcycles unless they are riding in a dedicated passenger seat equipped with its own foot rests. If you're riding with a passenger, your handlebars or handle grips must not be at a level higher than your shoulders. However, these rules don't apply if your passenger is seated in a sidecar or in an enclosed cab.

Fender Laws: Unlike some states, Florida doesn't apply its fender laws to motorcycles. Only commercial vehicles are required to have mud flaps and fenders framing the wheel well. Fenders are meant to reduce the volume of mud and debris thrown into the air by vehicle tires in motion.

Motorcycle Accent Lighting Laws: Florida law allows for accent lighting on your motorcycle, but it prohibits riders from mounting red lights on the front of a motorcycle and also prohibits blue lights of any kind in any configuration.

Motorcycle Turn Signal Laws: Florida law states that every vehicle — motorcycles included — must be equipped with electric turn signals in the front and rear of the vehicle. If you plan to customize your motorcycle, you'll have to keep turn signals on both ends of the bike in order to remain compliant with this requirement.

Motorcycle insurance requirements in Florida

Unlike Floridians who drive cars, motorcyclists in Florida aren't specifically required to carry insurance with personal injury protection (PIP), which covers your injuries if you're involved in an accident. However, the law does require motorcyclists to carry at least $10,000 in medical benefits coverage through either health insurance or the PIP portion of a motorcycle insurance policy.

In addition, if you're involved in a motorcycle accident and found to be at fault for causing it, you will be held financially responsible for the costs of injuries and property damage. There are three ways you can demonstrate financial responsibility:

  • Buy liability insurance, which pays for the injuries and property damage of other parties in an accident (up to your policy's limits)
  • Obtain a Financial Responsibility Certificate by posting a surety bond with a state-licensed company or depositing cash or securities with the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
  • Obtain a self-insurance certificate from the Florida Bureau of Financial Responsibility — this typically requires that you demonstrate your ability to pay for damages caused in an accident

While it's not required in Florida, we also recommend that you consider uninsured motorist coverage. This coverage pays for your expenses if you're involved in an accident with a driver who has no active insurance.

Motorcycle insurance costs: City-by-city breakdown

To show you how the cost of insuring a motorcycle can vary based on where you live, we've listed the average annual premiums for motorcycle insurance we collected for addresses in each of Florida's 20 biggest cities — along with a calculation of the difference between each city's average cost and the statewide average.

CityAverage annual costDifference vs. state average
Jacksonville$791-13%
Miami$1,353+49%
Tampa$964+6%
Orlando$817-10%
Hialeah$1,343+47%
Port St. Lucie$454-50%
Tallahassee$768-16%
Cape Coral$764-16%
Fort Lauderdale$1,106+21%
Pembroke Pines$1,084+19%
Hollywood$1,139+25%
Miramar$1,084+19%
Coral Springs$1,035+14%
Gainesville$734-19%
Palm Bay$638-30%
Clearwater$836-8%
Miami Gardens$1,343+47%
West Palm Beach$788-13%
Lakeland$758-17%
Pompano Beach$1,036+14%

While the cost of motorcycle insurance is typically higher in larger cities, our survey of quotes found that wasn't always true in Florida. For instance, the premium estimates we recorded for addresses in Jacksonville turned out to be somewhat lower than the overall Florida average. Meanwhile, a few cities such as Miami and Hialeah reported far higher average rates for motorcycle coverage, which is what we've come to expect for major cities in other states.

Methodology

Our analysis of motorcycle insurance in Florida involved nearly 200 sample quotes all based on the same driver profile. Our imagined insurance shopper was a 45-year-old man looking to insure a new 2019 Harley-Davidson FLHX Street Glide. He had 20 years of riding experience and recently participated in a basic motorcycle education course. Finally, our shopper was married and owned a home.

All these personal details have the potential to influence the final rate estimate, but none of them have as big an effect as the level of coverage you're purchasing. The quotes we collected used the following coverage limits:

  • Bodily injury liability coverage: $100,000 per person / $300,000 per accident
  • Property damage liability coverage: $50,000 per accident
  • Collision coverage: Included / $500 deductible
  • Comprehensive coverage: Included / $500 deductible
  • All other coverages: Not included

As you might have noticed, these limits are much higher — and therefore more expensive — than Florida's legal insurance requirement for motorcyclists, which only requires $10,000 of health benefits coverage. We chose to base our research on these standards for coverage because the legal minimums provide no financial protection for your motorcycle or your potential liability costs in a dispute. While we don't recommend it, you can probably find lower rates for motorcycle insurance than we did by opting for the legal minimum coverage.

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