Penalties for Driving Without Insurance in Nevada

Driving without car insurance in Nevada is considered a misdemeanor. If caught without it, you'll have to pay a fine ranging from $250 to $1,000, along with a license reinstatement fee of up to $750.

Penalties for driving uninsured in Nevada

All Nevada drivers are required to carry minimum liability coverage of at least:

  • $25,000 for bodily injuries per person
  • $50,000 for bodily injuries per accident
  • $20,000 for property damage per accident

There are two ways you might be caught driving without insurance: Either you can't show proof of coverage when a law enforcement officer asks for it, or the state's electronic database flags you. Nevada's penalties for driving while uninsured are based partly on the number of days you've let your coverage lapse and whether you've been convicted of this offense before.

Nevada's verification program and law enforcement

Nevada's department of motor vehicles maintains an electronic database — the Nevada Liability Insurance Validation Electronically (NVLIVE) system — to track registered vehicles and insurance policies. Insurers must report any lapsed policies to the DMV, which will then contact the owner. If you receive a notice, you’ll need to send a verification response form within 15 days.

If you're stopped by a police officer and can't show proof of coverage — such as a valid insurance ID card or the declaration page of your active policy — then the officer will report you to the NVLIVE system. You'll then get a notice.

Penalties for a first offense

Nevada has no grace period for a lapse in insurance coverage. If you are uncovered for even one day, you risk a registration suspension. The reinstatement fee for that is $250.

If it's your first offense and your coverage has lapsed for 30 days or less, Nevada will suspend your driving privileges but won't charge a fine. A lapse of 31–90 days or 91–180 days will result in a fine of $250 or $500, respectively. After that, the fine rises to $1,000.

You'll need to surrender your driver's license until you can send proof of insurance to the DMV. If your coverage has lapsed beyond 91 days, your insurer will also need to file an SR-22 certificate on your behalf before you can get your driving privileges reinstated. This form will need to stay on file for at least three years.

First offense lapse

1–30 days
31–90 days
91–180 days
181+ days

Fine

N/A$250$500$1,000

Driving privileges

Suspended until proof of insurance providedSuspended until proof of insurance providedSuspended until SR-22 filedSuspended until SR-22 filed

Reinstatement fee

$250$250$250$250

SR-22

N/AN/AYes, maintain for three yearsYes, maintain for three years

Penalties for a second offense

Repeating the violation within five years of your first conviction will lead to stiffer penalties. For the second round, you'll pay a $500 fine if you've gone uninsured for 31–180 days and $1,000 if it’s lapsed for 181 days or more. Your reinstatement fee will double, to $500, and the state will hold your driver's license until you purchase insurance coverage and send proof to the DMV. An SR-22 will also be required for any lapse longer than 90 days.

Second offense lapse

1–30 days
31–90 days
91–180 days
181+ days

Fine

N/A$500$500$1,000

Driving privileges

Suspended until proof of insurance providedSuspended until proof of insurance providedSuspended until SR-22 filedSuspended until SR-22 filed

Reinstatement fee

$500$500$500$500

SR-22

N/AN/AYes, maintain for three yearsYes, maintain for three years

Penalties for a third offense

If you receive a third (or subsequent) violation within five years, the state tags you as a habitual offender. If you're caught driving without insurance for up to 90 days, you'll pay a $500 fine. That climbs to $750 if the lapse is 91–180 days and $1,000 beyond 180 days. Your reinstatement fee will jump again, this time to $750.

Additionally, the state will suspend your license for 30 days, even if you've secured proof of insurance.

On your third offense (and beyond), your insurance company will need to file an SR-22 form— regardless of the number of days your insurance lapsed — which will have to stay on file for three years. If your policy lapses within that time frame, the state will add another three years to your SR-22 requirement.

Third offense lapse

1–30 days
31–90 days
91–180 days
181+ days

Fine

N/A$500$750$1,000

Driving privileges

Suspended for at least 30 days, regardless of length of lapseSuspended for at least 30 days, regardless of length of lapseSuspended for at least 30 days, regardless of length of lapseSuspended for at least 30 days, regardless of length of lapse

Reinstatement fee

$750$750$750$750

SR-22

Yes, maintain for three yearsYes, maintain for three yearsYes, maintain for three yearsYes, maintain for three years

License reinstatement requirements

As soon as you have proof of insurance and an SR-22 on file, you can begin the process of reclaiming your driving privileges. The reinstatement fee is $250 for first-time offenders, $500 for second-time offenders and $750 for third-time or habitual offenders. If you reinstate using a kiosk, you'll also be charged a $1 technology fee. In addition to paying these expenses, you must fill out and file a notarized Declaration of Responsibility with the DMV.

Reapplying for auto insurance in Nevada

After clearing those financial hurdles, you still must contend with your driving record. After one or more driving-without-insurance convictions, you may be seen as a high-risk driver, so insurance companies might not want to sell you a policy. If you're shopping for car insurance and run into this dilemma, the Nevada Automobile Insurance Plan may offer you a policy so you can comply with the laws.

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